Speed labels for open Wi-Fi networks rolling out now on Android 8.1

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  • Android 8.1 brings speed labels, which let you preview which open Wi-Fi networks are fast and which are not.
  • These labels range from “slow” to “very fast,” depending on the speed of the network.
  • The update is rolling out to devices running Android 8.1 as we speak according to the official Android account on Google+.

Any device running on Android 8.1 will soon display speed labels for open Wi-Fi networks, ranging from “slow” to “very fast.”

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After only …

One of the more useful changes teased with Android 8.1 was the ability to see the speeds of open Wi-Fi networks before connecting to them. After all, who wants to waste time trying a bunch of different public Wi-Fi networks only to find out that none of them actually work? Google’s solution is to provide speed labels, and it seems like this feature will be rolling out to Android 8.1 users in the near future.

If you are curious as to what these subjective labels mean, here are the speeds for each label:

  • Slow = 0 – 1 Mbps
  • OK = 1 Mbps – 5 Mbps
  • Fast = 5 Mbps – 20 Mbps
  • Very Fast = 20 Mbps+

As Android Police points out, Google’s Support page gives a brief summary of what these speeds allow you to do: for instance, on a slow network, you can make phone calls and send texts. On an OK network, you can read webpages, use social media, and stream music. On a fast network, you can stream most videos. Lastly, on a very fast network, you can stream very high-quality videos.

Judging by a recent Google+ post by the official Android account, speed labels should appear on devices running Android 8.1 very soon. Let us know if you see this feature on your phone!

via Android Authority

January 22, 2018 at 02:23PM