LG G7 ThinQ Teardown: LG doesn’t want you to open it

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LG delayed the announcement of the new G7 phone as the company decided to change business strategies. It’s been a favorite subject for months and surprisingly, most of the information we heard before launch turned out to be true. There’s that special Google Assistant button, Super Bright Display, a notch that can be hidden, built-in Boombox Speaker, and the Camera AI features. This year’s LG flagship is a direct rival of the Samsung Galaxy S9 and the Huawei P20. The phone was officially announced earlier this month and now it’s time for a teardown.

We’ve got our hands-on feature of the LG G7 ThinQ and we also shared with you the availability, pricing, pre-order, and release dates plus 7 things to remember about the phone.

The LG G7 ThinQ just received a teardown treatment by IFIXIT. The last LG phone opened by the team was the LG G5. That one was the modular phone which sadly, didn’t gain much traction in the industry. However, it did receive a repairability score of 8. The LG G6 released last year was no longer modular but we haven’t got the chance to pry it open.

As for this LG G7, the phone is shut. We don’t see any sign that the company wants it opened. There are no visible screws either but good thing, there’s heat and after some gentle prying, the glue separates. Removing the rear panels is not as nerve-wracking because the fingerprint sensor cable is integrated into the rear panel.

The mid-frame is secured by Phillips screws. Open it and you will see a wireless charging coil. At the bottom are speakers and some cables. You can disconnect the motherboard easily by lifting it out. Around the board are copper heat pipes and some thermal paste.

Remove the components further and you will see the 4GB RAM, Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 processor, and the 64GB Toshiba UFS. The dual rear camera comes out of the motherboard while the front-facing camera lifts right up.

The battery is glued in place. Some alcohol can loosen the battery. The IPS LCD screen is strongly fused to the assembly.

As for repairability, IFixit has only given this a 4 out of 10.

SOURCE: IFIXIT

via Android Community

June 8, 2018 at 01:31PM